Cermaq indicators

Cermaq reports on a number of indicators considered material for Cermaq and the industry. The performance on these Cermaq-specific indicators in 2016 can be found below, together with an overview of all reported indicators.

Cermaq reports in accordance to a wide selection of sustainability principles. We measure our performance against these principles and seek continuous improvement.

Cermaq reports on topics that have been found material for our operations and to our stakeholders. How we define our material topics is described in further detail in our Materiality Analysis. We use the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) framework to identify specific indicators to report on for each material topic, and these are presented under GRI indicators. In addition, we have developed a separate set of material indicators which are made specifically for our operations. These can be found on this page.

Below you will find an overview of all Cermaq indicators reported by material topic for 2016, and our performance on each of the Cermaq specific indicators.

Overview of indicators

The list below provides an overview of all indicators reported by Cermaq in 2016, both GRI indicators and Cermaq specific indicators.

Focus area

Material topic

Indicators


Healthy and nutritious food

  1. Product quality, health and safety

  2. Fish health and welfare

  3. Feed ingredients

  • Raw material ingredients
  • Customer health and safety assessment
  • Fish mortality
  • Medicine use
  • Vaccination program
  • Sea lice counts
  • Animal species and breed type
  • Non-compliance with product health & safety
  • Fines for product non-compliance


Thriving oceans

 

  4. Biodiversity and feed sourcing

  5. Biosecurity

  6. Blue economy

  • Feed sourcing and supplier assessment
  • Raw material ingredients
  • IUCN red list species with habitats in areas of operation
  • Wildlife interactions
  • Vaccination program
  • Fish escapes
  • Sea lice counts
  • Area Management Agreements
  • Economic value generated and distributed
  • Country-by-country financial and organizational data


People leadership

  7. Safety & workplace

  8. Community relations

  9. Human Rights

  • Injuries, lost days, absence
  • Senior management hired from local community
  • Local community engagement programs
  • Local community complaints
  • Non-compliance with societal regulations
  • Incidents of violations involving indigenous peoples’ rights
  • Economic value generated and distributed
  • Country-by-country financial and organizational data


Responsible production

  10. Value chain approach

  11. Certifications

  12. Beyond compliance:  Responsible business conduct

  • Fallow time/benthic impact
  • Water withdrawal and recycled input materials
  • Non-compliance with environmental regulations
  • Whistle blowing
  • Training on anti-corruption
  • Incidents of corruption
  • ASC certification


Climate action

  13. Adaptation

  14. Emissions

  15. Innovation


  • Financial implications, other risks and opportunities due to climate change
  • Energy consumption
  • GHG emissions (Scope 1, 2 and 3)
  • Energy reduction initiatives

 



Cermaq indicators

This section presents the sustainability performance of Cermaq's operations in Norway, Chile and Canada in 2016 for each of the Cermaq specific indicators. The table below shows all Cermaq specific indicators reported by material topic in 2016.


Material Topic

Indicator

Material Topic

Indicator

Fish Health and Welfare CEQ1 Fish Mortality Biosecurity CEQ2 Sea lice
CEQ4 Medicine use CEQ6 Area Management Agreements
CEQ5 Vaccination program Responsible production CEQ 3 Fallow time 
Feed sourcing and ingredients CEQ 8 Raw Material Ingredients  Local communities CEQ 11 Local Community Complaints
Biodiversity CEQ 7 Escapes Responsible business conduct CEQ 12 Whistle Blowing Incidents
  CEQ 17 Birds and Mammals Economic growth CEQ 15 Country by Country Financial and Organisational Data
Certifications CEQ 16 ASC


CEQ 1 FISH MORTALITY

Fish mortality is a key measure to evaluate fish health and welfare. To monitor fish mortality, a 12 months rolling rate was introduced in 2012. The rate measures number of fish mortalities for the last 12 months as a proportion of an estimated number of fish in the sea the last month. The benefit of a 12-month rolling rate is that long term trends are better represented. The indicator is a precise measure and a better “steering wheel” for management. Reduction of fish mortality is a key target in Cermaq and fish mortality is defined as a Key Performance Indicator. This means that it is followed up closely and reported monthly to the Central Management team and the Board of Directors.

The 12 months rolling fish mortality for Atlantic salmon was 7 percent at the end of December 2016 for Cermaq Group, compared with 6.3 percent in 2015. Cermaq Chile had higher mortalities compared with 2015 (6 percent) and had the highest mortality rate within the Group this year (8.7 percent). The increase was largely due to the algae blooms in March 2016 and the consequences of these events on the gills, general health conditions and performance of the salmon. Cermaq Norway decreased mortalities from 6.2 percent in 2015 to 5.5 percent in 2016. Cermaq Canada’s mortality rate was 8.3 percent, an increase from 7.2 percent in 2015, mainly related to environmental challenges such as algae blooms and low dissolved oxygen events seen in British Columbia.

Fish Mortality (Atlantic salmon)

12 months rolling mortality rate - ATS


In addition to Atlantic salmon, Cermaq Chile is farming Coho salmon and Rainbow trout. At year-end 2016, the 12 month rolling mortality rate for Coho decreased to 4.5 percent (from 8,5 percent in 2015). The mortality rate for Rainbow trout significantly increased from 2.5 percent in 2015 to 15.3 percent this year mainly due to one event of SRS in the XI region.

Fish Mortality (Rainbow Trout)

12 months rolling mortality rate - RBT

Fish Mortality (Coho salmon)

12 months rolling mortality rate - COS


Cullings are programmed events with the main objective to preserve the fish health situation of a locality, usually triggered by the presence of a disease. Each country has their own set of rules, including the type of disease to be culled and the time schedule to reduce the possibilities of transmission to other farms and companies. Also, when needed, Cermaq’s Fish Health team can propose culling events in order to maintain the general sanitary condition of an area.

During 2016, five cullings were reported in Cermaq at a Group level, where the fish was removed and transported to final disposal, complying with all local regulations. Three events were recorded in Norway as voluntary cullings due to heart related disorders such as HSMI and CMS. Chile reported one event in April which was a consequence of fish health challenges after the large algae bloom event seen in March 2016. Cermaq Canada reported one event in September, also related to algae blooms.

The stocking density is compliant with national regulations which are for Atlantic salmon 25 kg/m3 in Norway and 17 kg/m3 in Chile. Canada does not have a regulatory limit, however Cermaq Canada’s normal stocking density is 20 kg/m3.

CEQ 2 SEA LICE

Controlling sea lice levels is a high priority in all regions where Cermaq operates because high levels of sea lice negatively impact the immune systems of the fish and directly affects fish health and welfare. Also the skin of the salmon can be damaged by sea lice and the skin is one of the most important barriers against other diseases. It is also a priority to keep lice levels low to ensure it does not negatively impact wild salmon stocks.

Lice occur naturally in the marine environment. There are two species of lice that affect farmed salmon: Caligus sp. and Lepeophtheirus salmonis. Infestation by either lice species may result in stress and reduced immune competence, making the fish more susceptible to other diseases and health challenges. Therefore, effective lice management is a very important measure in fish health work, and is a pre-requisite for sustainable aquaculture. Sea lice management can be preventive, reducing the parasitic levels in normal farming practices without handling the fish. Preventive measures are thus less stressful for the fish and do not involve chemical use. Chemical treatments include bath and in feed treatment. Cermaq works continuously to enhance our sea lice management in all regions, with a focus on preventive measures.

Local Action Levels (Mean number of lice per fish)

In 2016, sea lice counts were controlled below the local action levels for all Cermaq operations. The local action levels in 2016 are provided in the table below.

CEQ 02 - Local Action Levels, mean Level of Lice per Fish


CHILE

NORWAY

CANADA

Ovigerous Females

Adult females

Total lice (mobiles + adult females)

2016

3

0.5

3


Sea lice counts Cermaq Chile

In Cermaq Chile the status of Caligus for Atlantic salmon and Trout has improved since the peak in April 2013. For Coho salmon, adult sea lice are not a challenge to the same degree as for Atlantic and Trout and the level has remained low in 2016. In total, the average count for adult female lice in Cermaq Chile (all species) was 0.91 in 2016 compared to 0.73 in 2015. There were somewhat higher counts in Q1 in 2016 compared with Q1 in 2015 (1.48 vs. 0.88).

Average Sea Lice Counts Chile - Atlantic salmon


The sea lice counts for Atlantic salmon in Chile was on average 1.36 adult female lice in 2016 compared to 1.42 in 2015.

There were somewhat higher counts in Q1 2016 compared to Q1 in 2015 (2.5 vs. 1.6), with higher counts in February (3.7) and a second increase in April. These higher counts were due to the environmental challenging conditions recorded during the Chilean Summer, specifically related to the algae blooms, after which handlings and treatments were reduced to a minimum to maintain fish health and welfare. After the algae blooms, an industry wide coordinated bath treatment was performed to reduce levels, resulting in on average the same loads as recorded for 2015. The lowest average count was in August and September after the winter coordinated bath treatment with 0.5 female parasites, which are also the months with coldest water temperatures.

Average Sea Lice Counts Chile - Coho salmon

Coho salmon is typically less affected by sea lice and the counts were zero adult females during the whole year.

Average Sea Lice Counts Chile - Rainbow Trout

The sea lice counts for rainbow trout in Chile shows one large event between February and May, with higher counts. The higher counts are related to the harmful environmental conditions seen in the Summer, including the algae blooms. The average adult female count for 2016 was 1.4 lice, which is an increase from 0.76 in 2015. The sea lice counts also are influenced by season and location of sites, with the highest counts in April with 6.3 female parasites and the lowest in December With zero parasites, after moving the fish to a less affected location.

Sea lice counts Cermaq Norway

In Norway, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority (NFSA) has published a list of salmon producers ranked according to a traffic light system. The system is based on the average period of time were the sites have had levels above the maximum allowed level of 0.5 adult female lice. Cermaq Norway is placed under the green traffic-lights.

In 2016, Cermaq Norway has scaled up its use of preventive sea lice measures such as lice skirts and cleaner fish with positive results. The average adult female counts for Atlantic salmon in Norway was low in 2016, with the highest count in February with 0.2 lice, while the counts for the remaining months of 2016 were low and well below regulatory limits.

Average Sea Lice Counts Norway - Atlantic salmon

In Q1 2016, the counts where higher compared to Q1 2015 (0.13 vs. 0.05). This was largely due to an increased load in Finnmark, mainly because of low sea temperatures combined with rough weather conditions, making it difficult to perform treatment.

Sea lice counts Cermaq Canada

In Cermaq Canada, the sea lice levels decreased significantly in 2016, from 1.71 average adult female lice and mobile lice in 2015 to 0.86 in 2016.

Average Sea Lice Counts Canada - Atlantic salmon

In December, the sea lice load increased and was 0.85 adult females and 0.71 mobile lice. The lice levels were influenced by favorable environmental conditions which allowed parasite development as well as the migration of wild salmon.

CEQ 3 FALLOW TIME

Cermaq complies with local and national environmental regulations related to effluents and waste, fallowing time and benthic impact assessment. All operations fully respected the fallowing requirements defined in regulations in 2016.

Fallowing and benthos assessment is necessary to make sure that fish feces and feed pellets won’t build up below or around farm pens, to monitor sea floor status and avoid any longer term or irreversible impacts. We monitor our fish feeding every day with underwater cameras to reduce spill of fish feed and reduce negative impacts of nutrient release, such as Nitrogen and Phosphorus. Also dissolved oxygen is measured on a daily basis at farm level to monitor the environmental condition needed to keep good health and welfare of our fish.

Fallow time is measured per week, from the last fish has been harvested and the first fish stocked in the next cycle. Fallow time respond to local regulations in Chile and Norway. There is no regulatory limit in Canada, but best management practice is used.

CEQ 03 - Average Achieved Fallow Time Between Production Cycles (weeks)

 Weeks

Cermaq Canada

Cermaq Chile

Cermaq Norway

Statutory requirements

-

12

8

2010

22

24

29

2011

13

12

17

2012

24

12

17

2013

27

12

14

2014

17

12

10

2015

55

12

25

2016

18

12

21


Local authorities play an important role auditing all salmon farming companies. If a deviation is detected, Cermaq reports the non-compliances with environmental regulations under indicator 307-1.           

In the last years Cermaq has performed trials of alternative fish nets that do not require copper based antifouling paint. Cermaq Canada has made trials of brass and metal nets, Chile has used stainless steel nets for farming and currently Norway is using Econets made of plastic (PET monofilament). The main goal is to reduce our impact on the environment, reduce handling of net exchange and prevent predator attacks through stronger net alternatives.

CEQ 4 MEDICINE USE

Cermaq is working systematically with preventive health measures in all countries of operation. Key elements include screening programs for monitoring relevant pathogens from broodstock until harvest size fish, the systematic use of vaccines, feeding with functional feeds, monitoring of water quality, mapping stress in our farmed salmon, and a restrictive use of antibiotics.

The tools developed over several years and the generation of knowledge has allowed for better forecasting of disease events, to lower the risk of disease outbreaks and secure the health and welfare of the fish. Despite preventive measures, sometimes treatment with medicine is necessary, and there are strict procedures in place for the use of medicine such as antibiotics and sea lice treatments. These chemical treatments are used strategically and only when strictly needed to avoid also the generation of resistance.

Antibiotics use

In Cermaq it is important that antibiotic treatments are held to a minimum, only when strictly needed to restore fish health and welfare. Our policy for the use of antibiotics is to limit the use to cases where:

  • Animal welfare is threatened by a bacterial disease

  • A diagnosis of disease exist with a prescription of antibiotic by an authorized person

  • The antibiotic has a proven therapeutic effect against the disease, and

  • The antibiotic is approved for use in fish farming

Our calculation of antibiotics use is a ratio between the amount of active ingredients used by tons of live weight of fish produced. This ratio is hence affected by seasonal variations and unpredicted mortality events such as algae bloom mortalities.

CEQ 4 -  Antibiotic used

Grams Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) per tonne live weight (LWE) produced for antibiotic use

In Cermaq Norway, no antibiotics were used in 2016. In previous years, the main reason for any use of antibiotics in our Norwegian operations has been mouth rot. The use has however been minimal, with the aim to ensure fish health and welfare. The Cermaq R&D team has been working in partnership with suppliers to develop solutions to control this disease with good results.

In Cermaq Canada, mouth rot was the primary cause of mortality in smaller fish and SRS was the main cause in larger fish in 2016. Both diseases require treatment with antibiotics. At the present there are few alternatives to treat fish for these diseases and our global R&D team is focusing their efforts to provide more tools and knowledge to find sustainable solutions. The environmental challenges experienced in 2015, including warmer sea water temperatures, improved in the Canadian operations during 2016, and the antibiotic use decreased 70% the past year.

In Cermaq Chile, the use of antibiotics per ton production decreased by 4% in 2016. The reduction was largely a result of new vaccine strategies for SRS (Piscirickettsia salmonis), the disease which is the reason for most antibiotic use in salmon farming in Chile. New strategies includes a live vaccine and double vaccination, a new antibiotic treatment regime and use of genetic resistant fish (QTL SRS). Finding a solution to the SRS challenge is a key priority for Cermaq’s R&D team.

These developments, together with a constant focus on a responsible use of antibiotics, led to a 26% reduction in antibiotics use at a Group level compared to 2015.

Grams Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) per tonne live weight (LWE) produced for antibiotic use

 

Cermaq Canada

Cermaq Chile

Cermaq Norway

Cermaq Group

2013

10

230

4

127

2014

9

279

5

147

2015

220

513

1

266

2016

65

493

0

197

-70%

-4%

-100%

-26%

Starting in 2016, Cermaq has also been reporting the antibiotic use online on a quarterly basis. In our quarterly sustainability report we provide the amount of active ingredient of antibiotic used by tonnage harvested, at the moment when the sites are fully harvested (closed cycle). This calculation follows the same measure used worldwide in the protein industry to allow for comparison with other protein producers, and hence differs from the calculation presented here (based on LWE produced per calendar year, instead of ton harvested per closed cycle of approximately 18 months).

Sea lice treatment use

Sea lice is a challenge for the industry worldwide and each country has specific set of requirements with thresholds which determines the proper management. Cermaq has policies and procedures in place to ensure that all treatments are conducted in accordance with local regulations and area management plans. More details can be found under the indicator Sea lice counts (CEQ2).

CEQ 4 - Sea lice treatment used in feed

Grams Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) per tonne live weight (LWE) produced for sea lice treatment in feed.

In Canada, only in-feed sea lice treatment is approved for use and the amount used decreased in 2016. Oral Emamectin is delivered through the fish feed and remains an effective alternative. The use of in feed treatments remained low in Cermaq Chile in 2016, however feed treatments increased in use compared to previous years. Challenges related to the algae blooms influenced sea lice management in the first part of the year, with an industry wide coordinated sea lice treatment performed during Spring to control industry levels. In Norway, there is limited use of in feed treatments mainly due to efficacy reasons.

In 2016, the amount of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (grams API) per tonne live weight (LWE) used for in feed treatment was 0.05 for Norway, 0.03 for Chile and 0.19 for Canada. For Canada and Norway, the use decreased by 30% and 46% respectively, compared with 2015. In Chile, the in feed use increased by 89% mainly due to the challenging environmental conditions and because in feed treatment is used at the moment of stocking, which increased after the algae blooms.

Grams Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) per tonne live weight (LWE) produced for sea lice treatment in feed.

 

Cermaq Canada

Cermaq Chile

Cermaq Norway

Cermaq Group

2013

0.277

1.749

0.042

0.990

2014

0.139

0.017

0.103

0.063

2015

0.271

0.015

0.092

0.083

2016

0.189

0.031

0.050

0.083

-30%

89%

-46%

-22%

CEQ 4 - Sea lice treatment used in bath

Grams Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) per tonne live weight (LWE) produced for sea lice treatment in bath

The use of sea lice bath treatment for Chile reached 9.67 gAPI/tonne LWE for 2016, which is a significant increase from 2015, and largely due to the challenging environmental conditions resulting from the algae blooms.

For Norway the sea lice bath treatment use was 0.67 gAPI/tonne LWE, which is an decrease of 75% compared with 2015. Cermaq Norway has had a strong focus on preventive sea lice management in the past year, with measures such as cleaner fish and skirts. Also hydrogen peroxide is used, which requires handling of the fish, but where the active ingredients is broken down into water and oxygen and hence has very limited environmental impacts.  Increasing sea lice resistance to chemical treatments is a concern for the industry in Norway and for Cermaq Norway it is a goal to strengthen preventive management and non-chemical alternatives further, while maintaining a strong focus on fish health and welfare, including reducing stress on the fish.

Grams Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (API) per tonne live weight (LWE) produced for sea lice treatment in bath

 

Cermaq Canada

Cermaq Chile

Cermaq Norway

Cermaq Group

2013

0.00

5.20

0.64

3.04

2014

0.00

6.04

0.98

3.46

2015

0.00

4.46

2.67

3.10

2016

0.00

9.67

0.67

3.95

0%

115%

-75%

26%


CEQ 5 VACCINATION PROGRAM

Preventive fish health is an effective approach to strengthen animal welfare and resistance to environmental and biological challenges. Preventive measures include broodstock and fish screening for viral and bacterial diseases to reduce transmission, using genetically resistant fish by means of natural breeding techniques (QTL), functional feed and the use of vaccines.

The vaccines available in Norway, Canada and Chile are related to the particular needs of each country. The vaccines used, are those assessed as effective for the species and for the disease in each specific region. Examples of diseases we vaccinate against are IPN, Vibriosis, ISA, BKD, Furunculosis, SRS, IHN and Enteric Red Mouth Disease. Vaccination is delivered mostly in the hatcheries by injectable vaccines. The objective is to protect the fish for the challenges faced during sea water farming. After the vaccination the smolts will have time to obtain immunity and thereby be protected against disease at the moment of stocking.

The fish can also be vaccinated to prevent disease in the fresh water phase or it can receive a booster. The goal of boosters is to increase the first immune response or the first defenses gained by the very first vaccination, allowing for a faster and stronger response against the disease. Cermaq’s global R&D team has a particular focus on developing effective solutions for SRS and mouth rot/ Tenacibaculum.

To fight SRS, Cermaq Chile has been working with oral boosters from Centrovet for the past years on their sea water operations and with the introduction of a novel live vaccine against P. salmonis from Pharmaq, which is also a double injectable vaccine strategy. Cermaq Canada and Chile also started using a live vaccine from Elanco to fight BKD.

Vaccination program in Cermaq (2016)

The following figure includes all the diseases for which vaccines are delivered by country of origin.

CEQ5 Vaccination program

 

 

 

 

Canada

Chile

Norway

SRS

X

Furunculosis

X

X

X

Vibriosis

X

X

X

Coldwater vibriosis

X

X

Winter ulcer*

X

X

IPN

X

X

ISA

X

Enteric Red Mouth

X

IHN

X

BKD

X

X

* Experimental trial for Moritella viscosa.

 

CEQ 6 AREA MANAGEMENT AGREEMENTS

Area based management agreements are of great importance for effective and preventive fish management. Area Management Agreements can be a voluntary measure, such as a best management practice, or it can be a national wide requirement, formalized under a written area management agreement between stakeholders in a defined area.

Regardless of the origin of these agreements, the agreements are tailored to the local situation and, typically, may include topics such as fallowing and sea lice management strategies, vaccination programs, containment and contingency plans, recapture management plans and disease control strategies in farmed and wild fisheries.

In 2016, all Cermaq sites operated under area based management agreements or were located in areas fully controlled by Cermaq.


CEQ 7 ESCAPES

Cermaq has comprehensive procedures for preventing and managing fish escapes. Fish escapes are regarded as serious incidents which receive special attention from Cermaq management and the Board of Directors. Fish escapes may typically occur if nets are damaged, because of weather conditions, after handling of the nets for bath treatments, or as a consequence of predator attacks. An early detection of a fish escape allows to recover the salmon and reduce the impact of the escape event.

Measures include fish escape prevention plans in all regions, contingency plans, and monitoring activities. In Cermaq Chile, monitoring is in place for the entire network installation by use of remotely operated vehicle (ROV), to assess the status of nets and detect any holes to prevent escapes. Cermaq Canada has tested metal nets, Cermaq Chile has tested and used stainless steel nets for farming in the XI region and currently Norway is using Econets made of plastic (PET monofilament). These stronger nets prevent larger interaction with predators, ruptures, and possible fish escapes. They also do not use copper based paint to reduce negative impacts on the environment.

Other measures include regular inspections of infrastructure, reporting to learn from previous escapes, implementation of and training in procedures securing the facility in case of escapes, and recapture of escaped fish. In Norway, Cermaq has an emergency cooperation with farmers in the county of Finnmark in case of an escape. Inspections are performed by the authorities in all regions with regards to escape prevention.

Number of escaped fish by region

Year

Cermaq Canada

Cermaq Norway

Cermaq Chile

Grand Total

2013

0

0

63273

63273

2014

21

0

0

21

2015

2

500

6844

7346

2016

1

425

0

426

The work to prevent escapes is a priority and is ongoing in all regions. In 2016, there was one minor incident of fish escape in Cermaq Canada, leading to one fish escaping during a handling. In Chile, no fish escapes were recorded during 2016. In Norway, three incidents led to the escape of a total of 425 fish. Two incidents were related to a sea lice bath treatment and the other incident related to a harvest service supplier, where 25 fish escaped.

In Norway, Cermaq has introduced DNA traceability for its smolt, enabling to determine whether an escaped salmon is farmed by Cermaq or another company. The first smolt of this kind was transferred to sea in 2015.


CEQ 8 RAW MATERIAL INGREDIENTS

At a global level, EWOS is the main feed supplier of Cermaq’s farming operations and hence this indicator is based on EWOS data.

Forage fishery dependency has been a challenge for a growing fish farming industry. Salmon needs marine ingredients to grow healthy and to keep a good content of omega-3.  The past years, the use of fish trimmings and byproducts in fish feed has increased considerably. In 2016, the marine index for EWOS increased to 30.1 percent from 27.2 percent in 2015. The specific content of marine ingredients in EWOS feed varies depending on price and availability of alternative raw materials.

Marine content in salmonid feeds

Notes: 2011-2016 figures are excl. EWOS Vietnam

In the FAO report “The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2016” (SOFIA 2016), it is reported that fish meal used in feed for salmon aquaculture has been decreasing for the past 20 years. At the same time aquaculture production at a global level has grown but not the capture production from forage fisheries (SOFIA Figure 1), indicating that the dependency between these two activities are decoupling. Efficient use of marine ingredients, byproducts and replacement with plant ingredients has allowed the salmon to grow keeping its good quality and the advantages relative to other proteins. Specifically in the past years EWOS and other feed suppliers have introduced new ingredients and lowered the marine content in its feed. The research into 'marine independence' provides the knowledge for further significant reduction in the future if necessary, for example using insects or algae in salmon feed. Under this scenario aquaculture is growing decoupled from fishery activities.

The marine nutrient dependency ratio (MNDR) is the ratio of each marine-derived nutrient used to feed salmon divided by the amount of each marine nutrient produced as a result of salmon farming (Crampton et al., 2010). Thus, it estimates the amount of marine protein and oil produced in salmon farming relative to the marine protein and oil consumed in the form of forage fish. The marine protein dependency ratio (MPDR) is the calculation made for proteins and the marine oil dependency ratio (MODR) is for oils and fats. Dietary protein sources and oils or lipids from all capture fish, shellfish or zooplankton are classified as marine sources. (Nofima Report 36/2014).

The efficiency in the use of marine ingredients is important, and farmed salmon is well known to be very efficient in its feed conversion. For example in 2016, EWOS estimated a MPDR of 0.90 (compared to 0.83 in 2015 and 1.01 in 2014), which means that the build-up of proteins by salmon has been higher than the amounts received through the feed. For marine oil the development is similar. EWOS used less oil in the feed (0.66) than the amount produced by the salmon. For comparison EWOS used 0.74 units of oil in 2015 and 0.79 units in 2014.

Estimated Marine Nutrient Ratios

Note: The figures are excl. EWOS Vietnam

The following list shows the countries of origin for many of the fish species used in fishmeal and fish oil purchased by EWOS and used in Cermaq’s production.

Country of origin

Fish species

Country

Anchovy

Chile, China, Peru

Blue whiting

Denmark, Faroe Islands, Iceland, Ireland, Norway, UK

Capelin

Iceland, Norway

Gulf menhaden

USA

Norway Pout

Denmark, Norway

Sand eel

Denmark, Norway

Sardine

Chile, Panama

Sprat

Denmark, Norway, Ireland

Cermaq has strict requirements to its feed suppliers, and encourages certified sources of ingredients. As stated on their web page, EWOS prioritizes the use of feed ingredients that is judged to be sustainable based upon sources such as IMARPE and Sernapesca in South America, ICES in Europe, and National Marine Fisheries Service, Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission, and Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission in the USA. EWOS is a strong supporter of the IFFO Responsible Supply Standards, and in line with Cermaq’s requirements, EWOS does not accept IUU/illegal fishing as sources for the fish oil or fish meal they purchase.  

EWOS participated in the development of the RTRS and ProTerra standards for responsible soy and also supports the FEFAC guidelines for responsible soy. In 2014, both EWOS and Cermaq signed The New York Declaration on Forests aiming at stopping deforestation and focusing especially on soy and palm oil.

EWOS source soy products from Brazil, their main supplier, that are certified to ProTerra, RTRS or equivalent. Use of soy products from other countries can be approved given evidence that they are responsibly sourced or that the suppliers have development programs in place to achieve credible third-party certification.

The table below shows the fish species and category of raw material used for salmonid feed primarily, but also raw materials used for other fish species like pangasius and tilapia. In 2016, EWOS’ use of marine ingredients derived from fish trimmings and by-products was 33 percent (compared to 32.2 percent in 2015).

Overview of fish species used to make fishmeal and fishoil for EWOS group feed 2016

Category

Species

Category %

Total  %

Fish trimmings & byproducts

Herring trimmings

50.8

16.3

White fish offal

24.1

7.8

Hake trimmings

3.0

1.0

Atlantic mackerel trimmings

7.9

2.5

Capelin

3.5

1.1

Various species

10.8

3.5

Fish trimmings & byproducts Total

 

100

33.0

Forage Fish

Anchovy

29.2

19.6

Blue whiting

31.2

20.9

Capelin

3.5

2.3

Gulf menhaden

7.9

5.3

Norway pout

2.0

1.3

Sand eel

2.3

1.6

Sardine

9.4

6.3

Sprat

10.7

7.2

Various species

3.8

2.5

Forage Fish Total

 

Other Marine Ingredients

 

100

67.0

Other Marine Ingredients Total

 

 

 

100%

Notes: Species that individually make up less than 2% of the mix have been grouped together under 'various species'.  Countries making up less than 2% of the total fish meal + fish oil are not listed.

More information on EWOS feed ingredients, sourcing and sustainability management is available in the EWOS sustainability report on their webpage.


CEQ 11  LOCAL COMMUNITY COMPLAINTS

We recognize that our operations impact our neighbors and local communities in various ways, and we take care to register all complaints to our operations in order to address the root cause and make improvements. Cermaq operates in remote areas and engages closely with local communities. In order to operate sustainably we need to have a respectful interaction with our local communities for a long term period.

There were no community complaints reported in 2016, compared to six in total for all regions in 2015.


CEQ 12 WHISTLE BLOWING INCIDENTS

Whistle blowing is regarded as positive in Cermaq Group because we get the opportunity to correct any incidence of wrong doing. Cermaq’s current whistle blower channel for external stakeholders was established in 2014, with appropriate routines, procedures and technical specifications.

In 2016, a total of 7 whistle blowing incidents were reported (internal and external). For comparison, there were five cases of whistle blowing incidents in 2015. The reports were assessed and closed in accordance with procedures.

Below are the whistle blowing incidents recorded in Cermaq by country for the past three years.

 

2014

2015

2016

Cermaq Norway

1

1

1

Cermaq Chile

0

1

4

Cermaq Canada

0

3

2

Cermaq Group AS

1

0

0

Cermaq Group

2

5

7


CEQ 15 COUNTRY-BY-COUNTRY FINANCIAL AND ORGANISATIONAL DATA

Transparency regarding organizational ownership, management and operations, is regarded as important to fight corruption and to demonstrate responsible business conduct. The table below shows Cermaq’s financial and organizational data for each country in the Group.

Country

Revenues before tax

Income tax

Investments

Community investment

Financial assistance received from government

Number of employees

Cermaq Group AS


-106



30



1



0.6



2.5



40


Cermaq Norway


1556



-338



371



1.2



1.4



578


Cermaq Chile


170



-151



176



0.3



7.4



2481


Cermaq Canada


868



-225



101



0.4



0.2



253


Total


2488



-684



649



3



12



3352


Numbers in mill. NOK

Period accounted for is 01.01.2016 to 31.12.2016.

NOTE: Figures include Salmones Humboldt for nine months (April-Dec.) except for Community investments, Financial assistance received from government and Number of employees. Community investments include support to various stakeholders and initiatives such as NGOs, sports, culture, training, education and various charities and foundations. For more information please consult the financial statements of Cermaq Group.


CEQ 16 ASC CERTIFICATION

The Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) aims to be the world's leading certification and labelling program for responsibly farmed seafood. The ASC's primary role is to manage the global standards for responsible aquaculture, which were developed by the WWF Aquaculture Dialogues. 

As of December 2016, Cermaq had 18 ASC certified sites. Of these 5 were in Norway, 5 in Canada and 8 in Chile.

ASC works with aquaculture producers, seafood processors, retail and foodservice companies, scientists, conservation groups and consumers to:

  • Recognize and reward responsible aquaculture through the ASC aquaculture certification program and seafood label.
  • Promote best environmental and social choice when buying seafood.
  • Contribute to transforming seafood markets towards sustainability.

Cermaq aims to certify its farming sites to the salmon standard for responsibly farmed salmon from the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC). This is the first time that Cermaq reports ASC certification as a separate indicator in our annual report. Ongoing certifications can also be found on ASC’s website.The table below provides an overview of all ASC certified sites in Cermaq as of 31 December 2016. 

Country

Site name

Fish species

Production capacity

Norway

Anevika

ATS

5400

Nordnes

ATS

3480

Store Lerresfjord

ATS

3480

Oksøya

ATS

5400

Veggfjell

ATS

3480

Chile

Canal Contreras

ATS

4500

Punta Laura

ATS

4800

Punta Laura Norte

ATS

3000

Unicornio Sur

ATS

3500

Estero Navarro

ATS

5236

Isla García

RBT

4500

Isla Marta

RBT

3750

Unicornio

RBT

3750

Canada

Bare Bluff

ATS

2640

McIntyre Lake

ATS

2640

Mussel Rock

ATS

2050

Brent Island

ATS

3000

Venture Point

ATS

3393

Note: Production capacity is in tons as maximum allowed biomass by farming site during one farming cycle. The production capacity is granted from 2015 until 2020, depending on the issue date of the certification

A certified farming site must comply with several requirements, including 150 sustainability criteria such as wildlife interactions, sea lice counts, fish escapes and unexplained loss among others. Some indicators such as wildlife interactions and sea lice counts must be reported and be publicly available. This information is provided in the Cermaq ASC Dashboard.

Advantages of ASC salmon

ASC certification can help consumers make positive environmentally and socially responsible choices when buying seafood. It gives at-a-glance reassurance that the seafood comes from a farm which uses responsible farming methods that minimize environmental and social impacts. It lets consumers enjoy seafood with a clear conscience; they know where it's come from and how it's been produced. It ensures transparency, so that seafood products are traceable from farm to fork.


CEQ 17 BIRDS AND MAMMALS

Cermaq recognizes the potential for fish farming operations to impact biodiversity, either directly or indirectly. We operate in areas with rich biodiversity where several species of plants and animals interacts with our farming activities. Also in Chile salmonids are non-native fish species where our operations could have an impact on biodiversity.

Cermaq does not operate any sites in any protected areas as defined by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) or National legislation. Birds and mammals mortalities is reported by accidental and intentional events and has been calculated as a total number of interactions divided by the total number of active sites from January to December 2016, following the definition set by the Global Salmon Initiative (GSI).

 

Accidental

Intentional

Birds

Mammals

Birds

Mammals

Chile

0

0.02

0

0

Norway

4.6

0

1.4

0

Canada

0.2

0.05

0

0

A requirement of the Aquaculture Stewardship Council, wildlife interactions on ASC certified sites are covered by public reporting within 30 days of any death of birds or marine mammals, whether unintentional or intentional. ASC requirements also include a requirement of no mortalities of endangered or red-listed marine mammals or birds as defined by IUCN or national endangered species list.

Cermaq will continue to install preventive measures and monitoring to reduce the number of interactions with wildlife. Please consult Cermaq’s ASC dashboard for reports of incidents with wildlife on ASC certified sites in each region.




Back to top